TITLE

Toward a Viable Policing Model for Closed Religious Communities

AUTHOR(S)
Arredondo, Tamara N. Lewis
PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
American Journal of Criminal Law;Spring2008, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p107
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses two events in Texas which provide the basis for a viable policing model for closed religious communities. The incidents involved a search of the premises of a religious group known as the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints (FLDS) carried out by law enforcement officials in Eldorado in 2008 and raid of the religious group Branch Davidians by federal agents in Waco 1993. Challenges to enforcing the law in such communities are assessed. Also noted is the role of policing in religious communities.
ACCESSION #
45107391

 

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