TITLE

Military-Civilian Intercourse, Prostitution and Venereal Disease Among Black West Indian Soldiers During World War I

PUB. DATE
June 1997
SOURCE
Journal of Caribbean History;1997, Vol. 31 Issue 1/2, p88
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
44971705

 

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