TITLE

Condom use at last sexual intercourse among unmarried, not living common-law 20- to 34-year-old Canadian young adults

AUTHOR(S)
Rotermann, Michelle; McKay, Alexander
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality;2009, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p75
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study utilized data from the Canadian Community Health Surveys (CCHS) to examine condom use among unmarried, not living common-law (UMNCL) Canadians aged 20-34 years. Males (59.9%) were more likely than females (49.9%) to report using a condom at last sexual intercourse. Condom use at last intercourse was more likely among younger respondents aged 20-24 (63.7% males; 53.8% females) than those aged 25-29 (56.0% males; 47.1 females) or 30-34 (54.7% males; 42.2% females). Over a third (35.8%) of those who reported having more than one intercourse partner in the previous 12 months and among those who reported three or four or more partners about 30% of males and nearly 40% of females reported not using a condom at last intercourse. Among all males, the percentage that used a condom at last intercourse was significantly greater than the national average in Prince Edward Island, Ontario, and the territories, and significantly lower in Quebec. Among females, condom use was significantly higher in Ontario and significantly lower in New Brunswick and Quebec. Multivariate analysis indicated that UMNCL females aged 20-34 who lived in rural areas were less likely than their urban counterparts to have used a condom at last intercourse. Those who reported having first intercourse at age 13 or younger were significantly less likely to report using a condom at last intercourse than those whose first intercourse occurred at age 14 or older. Overall, the findings indicate that large numbers of single young adult Canadians are at elevated risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI) including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
ACCESSION #
44762799

 

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