TITLE

A case study of translating ACGME practice-based learning and improvement requirements into reality: systems quality improvement projects as the key component to a comprehensive curriculum

AUTHOR(S)
A M Tomolo
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
Postgraduate Medical Journal;Oct2009, Vol. 85 Issue 1008, p530
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: In 2002, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) introduced a new requirement: residents must demonstrate competency in Practice-Based Learning and Improvement (PBLI). Training in this domain is still not consistently integrated into programmes, with few, if any, adequately going beyond knowledge of basic content and addressing all components of the requirement. AIM: To summarise the implementation of a PBLI curriculum designed to address all components of the requirement and to evaluate the impact on the practice system. METHODS: A case-study approach was used for identifying and evaluating the steps for delivering the curriculum, along with the Model for Improvement’s successive Plan–Do–Study–Act (PDSA) cycles (July 2004–May 2006). DATA SOURCE: Notes from curriculum development meetings, notes and presentation slides made by teams about their projects, resident curriculum exit evaluations curriculum and interviews. RESULTS: Residents reported high levels of comfort by applying PBLI-related knowledge and skills and that the curriculum improved their ability to do various PBLI tasks. The involvement of multiple stakeholders increased. Twelve of the 15 teams’ suggestions with practical systems-relevant outcomes were implemented and sustained beyond residents’ project periods. While using the traditional PDSA cycles was helpful, there were limitations. CONCLUSION: A PBLI curriculum that is centred around practice-based quality improvement projects can fulfil the objectives of this ACGME competency while accomplishing sustained outcomes in quality improvement. A comprehensive curriculum is an investment but offers organisational rewards. We propose a more realistic and informative representation of rapid PDSA cycle changes.
ACCESSION #
44738703

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics