TITLE

Dealing with complaints 1: a guide for the foundation year doctor

PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
British Journal of Hospital Medicine (17508460);Apr2008, Vol. 69 Issue 4, pM50
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses how to deal with complaints from patients. It discusses the nature of complaints, most of which are allegedly non-clinical, such as waiting for an appointment. The article points out that complaints do not necessarily reflect on one's individual expertise or level of care. It also provides suggestions on how to prevent complaints.
ACCESSION #
44716581

 

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