TITLE

Along Came a…Spider?

PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
Weekly Reader News - Edition 3;10/23/2009, Vol. 79 Issue 7, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports the findings of scientists about certain spiders in Taiwan which create life-size replicas of their own bodies as decoys to protect themselves from wasps. Scientist I-Min Tso believes their study is the first to show decoys made by animals and avers that spiders may be the only animal other than human beings capable of doing this.
ACCESSION #
44706089

 

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