TITLE

Time from positive screening fecal occult blood test to colonoscopy and risk of neoplasia

AUTHOR(S)
Gellad, Ziad F.; Almirall, Daniel; Provenzale, Dawn; Fisher, Deborah A.
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Digestive Diseases & Sciences;Nov2009, Vol. 54 Issue 11, p2497
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
There is no guideline defining the optimal time from a positive screening fecal occult blood test to follow-up colonoscopy. We reviewed records of 231 consecutive primary care patients who received a colonoscopy within 18 months of a positive fecal occult blood test. We examined the relationship between time to colonoscopy and risk of neoplasia on colonoscopy using a logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders such as age, race, and gender. The mean time to colonoscopy was 236 days. Longer time to colonoscopy (OR = 1.10, P = 0.01) and older age (OR 1.04, P = 0.01) were associated with higher odds of neoplasia. The association of time with advanced neoplasia was positive, but not statistically significant (OR 1.07, P = 0.14). In this study, a longer interval to colonoscopy after fecal occult blood test was associated with an increased risk of neoplasia. Determining the optimal interval for follow-up is desirable and will require larger studies.
ACCESSION #
44645828

 

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