TITLE

THE IMPACT OF LATE NINETEENTH-CENTURY UNIONS ON LABOR EARNINGS AND HOURS: IOWA IN 1894

AUTHOR(S)
Eichengreen, Barry
PUB. DATE
July 1987
SOURCE
ILR Review;Jul87, Vol. 40 Issue 4, p501
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper presents an analysis of data on male workers taken from an 1894 survey of the Iowa labor market. Consistent with the results of earlier research by Paul Douglas, the author finds evidence of a statistically significant and economically important union earnings premium. The analysis also shows that late nineteenth-century unionism, like unionism in the twentieth century, tended to reduce wage dispersion. On the other hand, the author finds no evidence that late nineteenth-century unions reduced the length of the workday for union members compared to nonunion workers.
ACCESSION #
4459491

 

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