TITLE

Fossil rewrites early human evolution

AUTHOR(S)
Dalton, Rex
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
Nature;10/8/2009, Vol. 461 Issue 7265, p705
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the newly discovered fossil named Ardipithecus ramidus which is also known as Ardi from Ethiopia. It cites the research team called the Middle Awash Project who conducted a 17-year investigation about early human evolution that leads to the discovery of Ardi. It states that the skeleton of a 4.4-million-year-old female shows detailed information that humans did not evolve from ancient chimpanzees as it has been believed. In addition, the details about Ardi also provide information regarding the geology and palaeoenvironment of the discovery site. The previous fossil discovered was a 3.2 million-year-old and known as Australopithecus afarensis or also known Lucy, it also came from Ethiopia.
ACCESSION #
44515375

 

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