TITLE

Less Is More

AUTHOR(S)
Phillips, Barbara A.
PUB. DATE
September 2009
SOURCE
Internal Medicine Alert;9/29/2009, Vol. 31 Issue 18, p137
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Imaging procedures are an important source of exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States and can result in high cumulative effective doses of radiation.
ACCESSION #
44453973

 

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