TITLE

Shift happening as tropics relocate polewards

PUB. DATE
August 2009
SOURCE
Ecos;Aug/Sep2009, Issue 150, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Blog Entry
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article provides information on the study conducted by a team of researchers at James Cook University related to the expansion of the tropical zones of the Earth. The study found that there is an extension of approximately 30 degrees latitude north and south of the equator of the climatic boundaries. The said expansion might cause a tropical cyclone over the next 100 years due to the relocation of the tropics.
ACCESSION #
44395490

 

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