TITLE

No Secrets survey highlights abuse in all its forms

PUB. DATE
April 2009
SOURCE
Learning Disability Today;Apr2009, Vol. 9 Issue 2, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the No Secrets consultation survey which shows the various of abuses that people with learning disabilities experience in Great Britain. It mentions that the most common abuse learning disabled encounter includes hitting, being pushed around, made fun of, being cheated out of money and shouted or threatened. Moreover, many of the learning disabled wanted to be listened and to have actions on their complaints to help them make things better.
ACCESSION #
44386462

 

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