TITLE

Single-Port, Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and Inguinal Hernia Repair: First Clinical Report of a New Device

AUTHOR(S)
Kroh, Matthew; Rosenblatt, Steven
PUB. DATE
April 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques;Apr2009, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p215
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective: To report the initial clinical cases of single-port, transumbilical cholecystectomy and inguinal hernia repair using a novel operating device. Methods: One patient each underwent single-port transumbilical cholecystectomy and transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using the Uni-Xâ„¢ Single Port System (Pnavel Systems, Inc.). The device was placed through a single infraumbilical incision in both cases. Novel, specialized instruments, bowed in the shaft for triangulation, were used in addition to standard laparoscopic instrumentation. During cholecystectomy, a single stab incision was made and a laparoscopic suture passer was used for additional cephalad retraction of the gallbladder. Results: Both procedures were technically successful without placement of additional trocars. Operative times were 59 and 47 minutes for the cholecystectomy and inguinal hernia, respectively. Blood loss was minimal, and there were no intraoperative complications. The patient who underwent cholecystectomy had a previously placed infusion pump for chronic pain management and was kept overnight. The patient who underwent TAPP hernia repair was discharged the same day. Follow-up at three weeks postoperatively demonstrated the patients to be without complaints. Conclusions: Transumbilical, single-port cholecystectomy and TAPP inguinal hernia repair are technically feasible. The first initial clinical experience with these procedures using this device is reported.
ACCESSION #
44292974

 

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