TITLE

Caricature and the New Negro in the Work of Archibald Motley Jr. and Palmer Hayden

AUTHOR(S)
Wolfskill, Phoebe
PUB. DATE
September 2009
SOURCE
Art Bulletin;Sep2009, Vol. 91 Issue 3, p343
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the depiction of African Americans in the art of the African American painters Archibald Motley Jr. and Palmer Hayden. It focuses on the ways in which their works sometimes reference the visual stereotypes of racial caricatures. As Motley and Hayden were associated with the Harlem Renaissance movement, and known for transforming the visual representation of African Americans in art, the question of why they would incorporate elements of such imagery is addressed. The themes of stereotype and humor in painting are analyzed, and statements by the artists are cited, which illuminate the context of their work.
ACCESSION #
44266937

 

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