TITLE

CLONING THE THYLACINE

AUTHOR(S)
GREER, ALLEN
PUB. DATE
July 2009
SOURCE
Quadrant Magazine;Jul2009, Vol. 53 Issue 7/8, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the project proposed by officials of the Australian Museum to clone the extinct thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger. The cloning would be based on the extraction of thylacine genetic material which had been preserved. When the cloning initiative was first announced, it elicited the support of private donors who would provide funding for the project. Scientists who studied the project however concluded the thylacine cloning was not possible because the genetic material available were either damaged or contaminated.
ACCESSION #
44140739

 

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