TITLE

Characterization of Oil and Fatty Acid Composition in Seed Produced by Canola Regrowth

AUTHOR(S)
Bhardwaj, Harbans L.; Hamama, Anwar A.
PUB. DATE
July 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Agronomy;2009, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p89
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Canola (Brassica napus L.) and its relatives are known to regrow after harvesting of the foliage. However, yield and oil characteristics of seed harvested from regrowth are unknown. An experiment was conducted to obtain such information. Pre-flowering foliage was harvested from 48 plots (cut plots) grown in virginia during 2001-02 season. A group of 48 companion plots (uncut plots) was left unharvested. Upon harvesting of foliage, these plots received a factorial combination of four rates each of P and K fertilizers (0, 50, 100 and 200 kg ha-1). Both sets of plots had previously received 100 kg ha-1 each of N, P and K. All 96 plots were harvested at maturity and data on seed yield and oil characteristics were recorded. The results indicated that seed yield from regrowth was 67% of uncut plots (1349 vs. 2020 kg ha-1). The oil content in regrowth plots was significantly lower than that in uncut plots (34.7 vs. 37.1%). However, the oil from regrowth plots was considered healthier since, it contained less saturated and more unsaturated fatty acids. Effects of P and K fertilizers on canola regrowth were variable. An additional experiment with a factorial combination of three rates each of N, P and K (0, 50, 100 kg ha-1) applied to the cut plots indicated that N rate effects were non-significant whereas increasing rates of P and K increased C18:0 and C18:3 fatty acids. Earlier research in virginia has established that pre-flowering canola foliage can be harvested to yield 11 Mg ha-1 of fresh greens and 1 Mg ha-1 of dry matter. Present results demonstrate the potential of canola as a dual purpose crop to enhance the income of small farmers. It could be harvested before flowering as a value-added feed/food product and the regrowth could be harvested for seeds to provide edible oil.
ACCESSION #
44140612

 

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