TITLE

A Malpractice Lawsuit Simulation: Critical Care Providers Learn as Participants in a Mock Trial

AUTHOR(S)
Jenkins, Randall C.; Lemak, Christy H.
PUB. DATE
August 2009
SOURCE
Critical Care Nurse;Aug2009, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on a malpractice lawsuit simulation that was used to teach members of a critical care health team bout the complexities of health care law and to help make them aware of the possibilities of litigation that critical care professionals face. An overview of financial costs that U.S. hospitals face annually as a result of medical lawsuits is presented.
ACCESSION #
43479931

 

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