TITLE

On the Sensitivity and Specificity of Nonword Repetition and Sentence Recall to Language and Memory Impairments in Children

AUTHOR(S)
Archibald, Lisa M. D.; Joanisse, Marc F.
PUB. DATE
August 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Aug2009, Vol. 52 Issue 4, p899
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: The present study examined the utility of 2 measures proposed as markers of specific language impairment (SLI) in identifying specific impairments in language or working memory in school-age children. Method: A group of 400 school-age children completed a 5-min screening consisting of nonword repetition and sentence recall. A subset of low (n = 52) and average (n = 38) scorers completed standardized tests of language, short-term and working memory, and nonverbal intelligence. Results: Approximately equal numbers of children were identified with specific impairments in either language or working memory. A group about twice as large had deficits in both language and working memory. Sensitivity of the screening measure for both SLI and specific working memory impairments was 84% or greater, although specificity was closer to 50%. Sentence recall performance below the 10th percentile was associated with sensitivity and specificity values above 80% for SLI. Conclusions: Developmental deficits may be specific to language or working memory, or include impairments in both areas. Sentence recall is a useful clinical marker of SLI and combined language and working memory impairments.
ACCESSION #
43421312

 

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