TITLE

Car-content tags: Always useless; they should die

PUB. DATE
April 2001
SOURCE
Automotive News;4/2/2001, Vol. 75 Issue 5923, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on the proposed phase out of domestic content labels for automobiles in the United States. Survey findings indicating that the labels are useless while incurring additional compliance costs for the industry.
ACCESSION #
4340829

 

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