TITLE

MUSIC AS THE OBJECT OF METAPHORICAL PERCEPTION

AUTHOR(S)
BARBU-IURASCU, VIORICA
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Linguistic & Philosophical Investigations;2009, Vol. 8, p159
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
According to Zbikowski, metaphor seems to be an inescapable part of musical descriptions. What makes music special is its relationship to language. Hamilton observes that music is a human activity grounded in the body and bodily movement and interfused with human life. Vickhoff claims that music seems to move us emotionally even if there is no such obvious reason. Feature imprinting is important for our ability to recognize voices and instrumental sounds.
ACCESSION #
43292322

 

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