TITLE

A cryogenic xenon droplet generator for use in a compact laser plasma x-ray source

AUTHOR(S)
Gouge, Michael J.; Fisher, Paul W.
PUB. DATE
May 1997
SOURCE
Review of Scientific Instruments;May97, Vol. 68 Issue 5, p2158
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Describes a cryogenic xenon droplet generator for use in a compact laser plasma x-ray source. Design of the apparatus; Production of drops with low spatial dispersion allowing consistent interception by a high power laser beam; Debris reduction from the laser-target interaction; Vaporization of the mass-limited, cryogenic droplets.
ACCESSION #
4290449

 

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