TITLE

LOWFAT COOKING: TIPS AND PITFALLS

AUTHOR(S)
Rubin, Karen Wilk
PUB. DATE
March 2001
SOURCE
FoodService Director;03/15/2001, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Deals with fat diets in the United States. Recommended dietary fat intake; Fat intake reduction; Tips and methods for lowfat cooking.
ACCESSION #
4281420

 

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