TITLE

Accentuation of suicides but not homicides with rising latitudes of Greenland in the sunny months

AUTHOR(S)
Björkstén, Karin S.; Kripke, Daniel F.; Bjerregaard, Peter
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
BMC Psychiatry;2009, Vol. 9, Special section p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Seasonal variation in suicides has been shown in many countries. We assessed the seasonality and the variation with latitude in suicides and homicides, and the impact of alcohol on the seasonality in suicides. Methods: Official computerized registers on causes of death in all Greenland during 1968-2002 were used. Sales data on beer from one of the major food store chains for July 2005-June 2006 were examined. Seasonal variation was assessed by Rayleigh's test for circular distributions. Results: There were a total of 1351 suicides and 308 homicides. The suicides rate varied from 4.2/ 100 000 person-years in 1971 to 128.4/100 000 person-years in 1987. The homicide rate varied from 2.1/100000 person-years in 1969-1970 to 34.8/100 000 person-years in 1988. Out of the 1351 suicides, 80.5% were committed by men and 19.5% by women. Median age was 25 years (n = 1351; Range 11-84 years). Violent methods of suicide were used in 95% of all cases (n = 1286). Out of the 308 homicide victims, 61% were men and 39% were women, and 13% were killed in multiple homicide events. There was a significant seasonal variation with peaks in June and troughs in the winter in all suicide cases (n = 1351, r = 0.07; Z = 7.58, p < 0.001), in violent suicides (n = 1286; r = 0.07; Z = 6.97; p < 0,001), in suicides in men (n = 1087; r = 0.07; Z = 5.39; p < 0.002) , and in women (n = 264; r = 0.10; Z = 2.36; p < 0.05), but not in homicides nor in consumption of beer. There was a bi-phasic seasonal variation in suicide victims where an alcohol-related condition was included in the death certificate Suicides were more concentrated in the summer months north of the Arctic Circle (n = 577, r = 0.09, Z = 4.45, p < 0.01) than south of it (n = 769, r = 0.07, Z = 3.76, p < 0.002) and most concentrated in North Greenland (n = 33; r = 0.35; Z = 4.11; p < 0.01), where 48% of suicides occurred during the period of constant light. When including astronomical twilight in the constant light period 82% occurred during this time. Conclusion: There was a concentration of suicides but not homicides in the summer months in all Greenland. The concentration was most pronounced at high latitudes.
ACCESSION #
42408648

 

Related Articles

  • The Suicidal Process: Time to Intervene? Kurtitzky, Louis // Clinical Cardiology Alert;Apr2009 Clinical Briefs in Primary, p7 

    The article discusses research being done on suicide in the U.S. It references a study by E. A. Deisenhammer et al., published in the 2009 issue of the "Journal of Clinical Psychiatry." The researchers examined 82 persons with failed suicide attempts through interviews within 72 hours. An...

  • Small County Jail in Upstate New York Has Big Problem With Suicides. Secret, Mosi // Pro Publica;3/28/2010, p1 

    The article offers information on the increase in the number of suicides in the jail of Erie County Holding Facility. It states that most of the county jails were originally designed to hold low-level offenders, which now serve, to some degree, as de facto psychiatric wards. It mentions that...

  • News.  // Therapy Today;Sep2005, Vol. 16 Issue 7, p14 

    The article presents news briefs related to psychotherapy as of September 2005. A new study shows that a brief course on talking therapy compared with standard suicide treatment reduced the risk of subsequent suicide attempts. Kirklees council in England has funded three new bibliotherapist...

  • Recognizing Suicidal Patients in a Primary Care Practice. Sadovsky, Richard // American Family Physician;10/15/2002, Vol. 66 Issue 8, p1528 

    Discusses the study 'Contact With Mental Health and Primary Care Providers Before Suicide: A Review of the Evidence,' by J.B. Luoma et al., from the June 2002 issue of the 'American Journal of Psychiatry.'

  • Highlights of this issue. Shergill, Sukhwinder S. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Sep2012, Vol. 201 Issue 3, pA11 

    The article presents abstracts on psychiatry topics which include the role of exercise in improving depressive symptoms and preventing suicide, a morale among mental health workers in Great Britain, and remission in psychotic illness.

  • Indian research on suicide. Vijayakumar, Lakshmi // Indian Journal of Psychiatry;Jan2010 Supplement, Vol. 52, pS291 

    The suicide rate in India is 10.3. In the last three decades, the suicide rate has increased by 43% but the male female ratio has been stable at 1.4 : 1. Majority (71%) of suicide in India are by persons below the age of 44 years which imposes a huge social, emotional and economic burden. Fifty...

  • State of Mind. Howe, D. K. // American Fitness;May/Jun2008, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p18 

    The article presents information on a study which investigated the mental health condition of people in various states in the U.S. The study conducted by the Mental Health America has classified U.S. states according to the mental disposition of people. The study also reveals On average, the...

  • The clinical implications of church attendance and suicide. Poole, Rob // British Journal of Psychiatry;Sep2014, Vol. 205 Issue 3, p248 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Prospective prediction of suicide in a nationally representative sample: Religious service attendance as a protective factor," by E.M. Kleiman and R.T. Liu.

  • Treatment of suicidal people around the world. Bruffaerts, R.; Demyttenaere, K.; Hwang, I.; Chiu, W.-T.; Sampson, N.; Kessler, R. C.; Alonso, J.; Borges, G.; de Girolamo, G.; de Graaf, R.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Hu, C.; Karam, E. G.; Kawakami, N.; Kostyuchenko, S.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Lee, S.; Levinson, D.; Matschinger, H. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Jul2011, Vol. 199 Issue 1, p64 

    Background: Suicide is a leading cause of death worldwide; however, little information is available about the treatment of suicidal people, or about barriers to treatment.Aims: To examine the receipt of mental health treatment and barriers to care among suicidal people...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics