TITLE

The Korean Peace Process: On Again

PUB. DATE
March 2001
SOURCE
Newsweek (Pacific Edition);03/19/2001 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 137 Issue 12, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses United States foreign policy towards North Korea. Plan of U.S. President George W. Bush to resume talks with North Korea on reducing nuclear missiles; How North Korea has been selling missiles to Pakistan; Relationship of North Korea and South Korea.
ACCESSION #
4211352

 

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