TITLE

TESTING THEORY AND WHY THE 'UNITS OF ANALYSIS' PROBLEM IS NOT A PROBLEM

AUTHOR(S)
Ember, Melvin; Ember, Carol R.
PUB. DATE
September 2000
SOURCE
Ethnology;Fall2000, Vol. 39 Issue 4, p349
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses why cross-cultural comparison is possible and why theory needs to be tested universally. It discusses why worldwide cross-cultural results are likely to be more generally valid (and more useful practically) than more limited comparisons, and certainly more generalizable or trustworthy than single-case analyses or theory that has never been tested. Answers are provided for the main objections to worldwide cross-cultural research: the supposed incomparability of cultural traits, the supposed incomparability of units of analysis, the supposed impossibility of unbiased sampling, and what is known as "Galton's problem." (Theory, testing, cross-cultural, units)
ACCESSION #
4204944

 

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