TITLE

Personal background bias

AUTHOR(S)
Mellman, Mark S.
PUB. DATE
June 2009
SOURCE
Hill;6/3/2009, Vol. 16 Issue 63, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the impact of the judge's background and experiences on his decisionmaking.
ACCESSION #
42009566

 

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