TITLE

FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO THE WAR ON TERROR: THE EVOLUTION AND APPLICATION OF THE STATE SECRETS PRIVILEGE

AUTHOR(S)
Crook, Jason A.
PUB. DATE
February 2009
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2009, Vol. 72 Issue 1, p57
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an analysis of the evolution and application of the state secrets privilege in U.S. law starting from the Civil War period and extending to the War on Terror. It notes the important role played by state secrets privilege in shaping the admissibility of certain pieces of evidence in actions against the U.S. and affiliated parties. Also noted is the potential of the state secrets privilege to change the scope of litigation available to aggrieved parties in the context of the War on Terror.
ACCESSION #
41995303

 

Related Articles

  • The Relativity of Relevancy.  // Civil War Times;Jun2007, Vol. 46 Issue 4, p23 

    The article presents information on various articles published within the issue including one by Frank J. Williams on the comparison of the American civil war with the War on Terrorism, and an interview with civil war historian James M. McPherson.

  • WISDOM PREPAID. Kushlan, James P. // Civil War Times Illustrated;Jun2002, Vol. 41 Issue 3, p4 

    Compares the Anaconda Plan of the Union Army against the Confederate Army in the American Civil War and the Operation Anaconda of the U.S. Army against the Taliban and Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan. Influence of the Union Army strategy on the U.S. Army strategy; Importance of the Civil War...

  • MILITARY TRIALS OF TERRORISTS: FROM THE LINCOLN CONSPIRATORS TO THE GUANTANAMO INMATES. Williams, Frank J.; Benjamin, Nicole J. // Northern Kentucky Law Review;2012, Vol. 39 Issue 4, p609 

    The article focuses on military commissions, which are special military operated courts, used to judge extraordinary cases during war time. It examines the changes as well as the developments occurred in military commission trials since former U.S. President Abraham Lincoln's assassination to...

  • "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.". Miller, Randall M.; Rice, Kym S.; Filene, Benjamin // Journal of American History;Dec2006, Vol. 93 Issue 3, p805 

    The article describes an American Civil War exhibit based on the issues of secession, slavery and emancipation, and civil liberties during wartime. Housed at the National Convention Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the exhibit is titled "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War. " The...

  • Suing for Freedom.  // Current Events;4/2/2007, Vol. 106 Issue 22, p5 

    The article reports on the case Dred Scott v. Sanford, filed in the U.S. Supreme Court, 150 years ago by Dred Scott, a slave. His legal battle ended with a ruling that slavery is morally lawful and that no person of African descent could be a citizen and the Missouri Compromise, passed by the...

  • Free Speech and National Security. Stone, Geoffrey R. // Indiana Law Journal;Summer2009, Vol. 84 Issue 3, p939 

    The article examines the imbalance between free speech and national security in the U.S. It analyzes the two issues from which the tension originates, one involves speech that criticizes the government another involves secrecy. It also explores such issues with reference to seven episodes in...

  • STATE SECRETS AND EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTABILITY. Wells, Christina E. // Constitutional Commentary;Summer2010, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p625 

    The article discusses the policy of U.S. President Barack Obama regarding state secrets privilege, one that established evidentiary and harm requirements before asserting the privilege. It examines explanatory accountability and the extent to which it is deficient as an accountability mechanism....

  • Watching The Watchmen. Lee, Stephen // Wired;Oct2009, Vol. 17 Issue 10, p25 

    The author expresses his views on the decision of U.S. President Barack Obama to rely on the notion of state secrets. He relates his working experience with the Counterterrorist Center of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, in which he wrote reports and briefings for national security...

  • TOO BIG A CANON IN THE PRESIDENT'S ARSENAL: ANOTHER LOOK AT UNITED STATES F. NIXON. Lane, Eric; Schwarz Jr., Frederick A. O.; Berman, Emily // George Mason Law Review;Spring2010, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p737 

    The article examines the decision of the Supreme Court in the case United States v. Nixon which recognized executive privilege as an executive prerogative rooted in Article II of the Constitution. It explains how the case failed to balance the costs and benefits of secrecy in policy making. The...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics