TITLE

Flexibility in the colouration of the meninx (brain covering) in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata): investigations of potential function

AUTHOR(S)
Gibson, R.; Burns, J. G.; Rodd, F. H.
PUB. DATE
June 2009
SOURCE
Canadian Journal of Zoology;Jun2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p529
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Many organisms can change the apparent colour of their bodies by altering the aggregation of pigment in chromatophores in a process known as physiological colour change. In this study, we investigate a previously unstudied example of physiological colour change, from clear to black, of a brain covering, or meninx, in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata Peters, 1859). UV protection in bright light was our primary hypothesis for the function of the meningeal colour, with a cost of increased conspicuousness to avian predators selecting for plasticity in the trait. An alternate hypothesis was that this flexible trait could be a physiological by-product of stress. Thus, we investigated the response of meningeal colour to light, stress, and simulated predator attacks, and also whether the black meninx affected conspicuousness to potential predators. Meningeal response to higher light levels did not differ from baseline responses. However, we did find that stress induced a sex-biased, rapid darkening of the meninx; this darkening then declined over time. These results suggest that meningeal blackness could be used as a novel, noninvasive indicator of stress level in guppies. We found no evidence for a role of predation in meningeal colour: meninx colour did not respond to the presence of a predator model and human “predators” detected similar numbers of guppies with black meninges and guppies with clear meninges.
ACCESSION #
41682927

 

Related Articles

  • Dannemora moose had brain worm, DEC says. LYNCH, MIKE // Adirondack Daily Enterprise;7/28/2010, Vol. 117 Issue 177, p1 

    The article reports that according to the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, a moose that died on July 7, 2010 near Dannemora had brain worm.

  • Perception, Action, and Roelofs Effect: A Mere Illusion of Dissociation. Dassonville, Paul; Bala, Jagdeep Kaur // PLoS Biology;Nov2004, Vol. 2 Issue 11, p1936 

    A prominent and influential hypothesis of vision suggests the existence of two separate visual systems within the brain, one creating our perception of the world and another guiding our actions within it. The induced Roelofs effect has been described as providing strong evidence for this...

  • Brain worm studies in Manitoba.  // Western Sportsman;Jan/Feb2014, Vol. 45 Issue 6, p6 

    The article reports on the request of the Manitoba Government to hunters to submit the head and upper neck of white-tailed deer, so that researchers could study the brain worm parasite prevelent in them.

  • Attraction of the land snail Anguispira alternata to fresh faeces of white-tailed deer: implications in the transmission of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis. Bird, Jacqueline; Garvon, Jason M. // Canadian Journal of Zoology;Feb2005, Vol. 83 Issue 2, p358 

    Terrestrial gastropods serving as intermediate hosts of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (Dougherty, 1945) are infected either by crawling over infected faeces or by contact with larvae washed off faecal pellets onto surrounding soil. Some studies have concluded that gastropods avoid faeces;...

  • Clinico-pathological findings and cerebrospinal fluid analysis in llamas ( Lama glama) experimentally infected with the meningeal worm Parelaphostrongylus tenuis. Ismail, Zuhair Bani; Levy, M.; Qureshi, T.; Lankester, M. W. // European Journal of Wildlife Research;Feb2011, Vol. 57 Issue 1, p175 

    In this study, the clinical progression of experimental infection of llamas ( Lama glama) with Parelaphostrongylus tenuis is described. The onset and characterization of neurologic deficits and changes in the hematology, serum biochemical, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in affected llamas are...

  • Meningeal Madness. RANTA, BRUCE // Ontario Out of Doors;2011 Hunting Annual, Vol. 43 Issue 8, p38 

    The article reports on the impact of the rise in the population of white-tail deer herds on moose herds. Many biologists believe that the cause of many moose declines is a tiny brain-dwelling parasite commonly found in white-tailed deer. The parasite is referred to as the meningeal worm by...

  • ESTABLISHMENT OF ADULT PARELAPHOSTRONGYLUS TENUIS, PATENT INFECTIONS, AND ACQUIRED IMMUNITY AFTER EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) AND RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS ELAPHUS). Duffy, Michael S.; Greaves, Trent A.; Burt, Michael D.B. // Journal of Parasitology;Apr2004, Vol. 90 Issue 2, p245 

    Investigates the effect of different exposures of white-tailed deer and red deer to the parasite Parelaphostrongylus tenuis. Acquired immunity after experimental infection; Life history of P. tenuis; Anatomical location; Prepatent period and output of first-stage larvae in feces; Persistence of...

  • Rare type of scoliosis investigated. Barakat, Christine; McCluskey, Mick // Equus;Mar2009, Issue 378, p10 

    The article discusses research on scoliosis in horses conducted by Cornell University researchers in New York published in the 2008 issue of "American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention Proceedings." The researchers have discovered that a rare type of scoliosis in adult horses is...

  • Heat stress killing Ontario moose. Meadows, Bryan // Ontario Out of Doors;Apr2007, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p14 

    The article focuses on the increasing deaths of moose in Ontario. As per the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists, heat stress along with health draining parasites like brain worm are the reasons for moose deaths. It is noted that global warming can be another reason for decline in...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics