TITLE

Children who earn more less likely to help parents financially: Study

PUB. DATE
April 1998
SOURCE
Jet;04/06/98, Vol. 93 Issue 19, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Mentions a study by the Lutheran Brotherhood insurance organization indicating that adult children who earn less than $20,000 are more likely to help out their parents financially than those earning higher salaries.
ACCESSION #
414448

 

Related Articles

  • Happiness functions with preference interdependence and heterogeneity: the case of altruism within the family. Bruhin, Adrian; Winkelmann, Rainer // Journal of Population Economics;Aug2009, Vol. 22 Issue 4, p1063 

    This study investigates the prevalence and extent of altruism by examining the relationship between parents’ and their adult children’s subjective well-being in a data set extracted from the German Socio-Economic Panel. To segregate the share of parents with altruistic preferences...

  • LIVING ARRANGEMENTS IN WESTERN EUROPE: DOES CULTURAL ORIGIN MATTER? Giuliano, Paola // Journal of the European Economic Association;Sep2007, Vol. 5 Issue 5, p927 

    Conventional economic analyses have not been successful in explaining differences in living arrangements and particularly the dramatic increase in the fraction of young adults living with their parents in Mediterranean Europe. This paper presents a cultural interpretation. I argue that the...

  • How to Borrow Money from Your Parents. Pollan, Stephen M.; Levine, Mark // Money;May2007, Vol. 36 Issue 5, p44 

    The article focuses on finding the best way to ask your parents for a loan. The author suggests asking with your partner face to face, presenting a legitimate expense such as a down payment for a house and mentioning the time sensitive nature of the request. Also recommended is presenting...

  • When the Kids Move Back In. Kobliner, Beth // Money;Jun2009, Vol. 38 Issue 6, p30 

    The article discusses steps that parents can take to assist their children financially when their children move back home. Suggestions that are given in the article include to not baby them, to assist them in finding a job and to offer them financial advice that will assist them when it is time...

  • WHAT TO TELL THE KIDS ABOUT YOUR MONEY. MAGNARELLI, MARGARET // Money;Sep2012, Vol. 41 Issue 8, p108 

    The article presents recommendations for sharing one's financial situation with adult children, focusing on how much and what types of information about family finances should be disclosed. Topics include estate planning, naming a child as executor or power of attorney in case of emergency, and...

  • What do you owe your kids? Harris, Marlys // Money;Mar2008, Vol. 37 Issue 3, p102 

    The article reports on the amount of money spent by the baby-boomer generation on their adult children. According to a University of Michigan study from the year 2004, parents provided about $2,200 a year in aid to children ages 18 to 34. The price of independence is much higher than before and...

  • First National Bank of Mom and Dad. Wang, Penelope // Money;May2005, Vol. 34 Issue 5, p59 

    The article reports that young adults are turning to relatives for the funds to buy homes. Whatever stigma was attached to accepting parental help seems to be on the wane: The National Association of Realtors reports that 24% of first-time buyers in 2004 received gifts for a down payment from...

  • How to Talk Money With Mom and Dad. Max, Sarah // Money;Sep2009, Vol. 38 Issue 9, p31 

    The article discusses how children should go about determining the financial security of their parents. Difficult but necessary questions to ask include how much money they have, and will it be enough to last for the remainder of their lives. Children should also assess the safety of their...

  • Number of Children and Upstream Intergenerational Financial Transfers: Evidence From Hong Kong. Chou, Kee-Lee // Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences & Socia;Mar2010, Vol. 65B Issue 2, p227 

    Objectives. This study examined financial transfers from adult children to elderly parents in Hong Kong and tested three hypotheses about the motives for such transfers. We address previous research, suggesting that family financial support for retirees will decline in the coming decades as a...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics