TITLE

Looking For A Little Love

AUTHOR(S)
Barrett, William P.
PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
Forbes Asia;5/11/2009, Vol. 5 Issue 8, p46
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the securities fraud scandal in which Apple Inc.'s chief executive officer (CEO) and chairman Steve Jobs allegedly helped set advantageous grant dates for stock options for himself and other executives. When U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission's lawyers questioned Nancy R. Heinen, Apple's ex-general counsel, without admitting anything she paid $2.2 million to settle charges that she had backdated option grants for Jobs, herself and others.
ACCESSION #
41227141

 

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