TITLE

EMOTIONAL AND MOTIVATIONAL TENDENCIES: THE KEY TO QUALITY NURSING CARE?

AUTHOR(S)
Glen, Sally
PUB. DATE
January 1998
SOURCE
Nursing Ethics;Jan1998, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The question of how to improve the quality of nursing care is quite properly perceived to be at the heart of the contemporary nursing debate. Yet it is not clear what quality in health care is; nor is it clear what quality nursing care is. This article will explore why quality issues are such a matter of concern in public and political debate and how different concepts of quality determine different definitions of nursing. The former definitions constitute a developmental continuum of nursing from minimally acceptable levels of competence to excellence. It is argued that the quality of nursing cannot be assessed in terms of performance referenced criteria, but only in terms of the personal qualities displayed in the performance. The key to improvement in practice may be the improvement of emotional and motivational tendencies. In essence, professional development implies personal development.
ACCESSION #
4089220

 

Related Articles

  • CALENDAR OF EVENTS.  // Nursing Ethics;Jul2002, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p454 

    Presents a 2002-03 calendar of events concerning nurses and nursing ethics. Schedule and venue; Contact information; Theme of the congresses and courses.

  • EDITORIAL. Tschudin, Verena // Nursing Ethics;Jul2002, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p339 

    Editorial. Introduces the articles published in the 2002 issue of 'Nursing Ethics.' Nursing care in restrictive contexts; Military nursing; Demand for high level of ethical sensitivity, knowledge and action.

  • A fundamental ethical approach to nursing: some proposals for ethics education. Gastmans, Chris // Nursing Ethics;Sep2002, Vol. 9 Issue 5, p494 

    The purpose of this article is to explore a fundamental ethical approach to nursing and to suggest some proposals, based on this approach, for nursing ethics education. The major point is that the kind of nursing ethics education that is given reflects the theory that is held of nursing. Three...

  • Acute care decisions. Haddad, Amy; Cerrato, Paul L. // RN;Jan96, Vol. 59 Issue 1, p17 

    Focuses on ethical issues that arise when a doctor does not report to the hospital in a medical emergency and gives instructions to the nurse over the phone. Duties of doctors and nurses; Mutual trust between doctors and nurses; Nurses' obligation to obey doctors' instructions; Importance of...

  • BETWEEN US. Van Meter, Margaret // RN;Apr86, Vol. 49 Issue 4, p68 

    Addresses questions about nursing ethics. Manner to handle dissent; Prerequisites to being promoted to head nurse; Way to handle a supervisor's harassment due to a second job.

  • Inquest highlights legal traps for telephone advice.  // Australian Nursing Journal;Apr98, Vol. 5 Issue 9, p15 

    States that according to a report in the `Nursing Standard' periodical, to avoid legal problems, nurses in England dealing with patients on the telephone might soon have to tape their calls. Reference to an inquest into the death of a woman who died after taking alcohol and drugs in northern...

  • Values and Dealing with Change. Savett, Laurence A. // Creative Nursing;2000, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p11 

    Discusses the values to be considered when dealing with conflicts in the career of nurses. Universal ethical issues; Clinical decisions; Outside pressures; Moral choices; Teaching about maintaining values and dealing with change.

  • What are the limits to the obligations of the nurse? Edwards, Steven D. // Journal of Medical Ethics;Apr96, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p90 

    Examines the nature and the extent of the obligations of nurses in Great Britain. Professional and moral obligations; Moral foundation of the nurse's obligations to her employer; Persons to whom nurses have obligations; Conflicts of obligations; Distinction between ordinary and extraordinary...

  • Acute care decisions. Haddad, Amy; O'Connor, Eileen // RN;Sep94, Vol. 57 Issue 9, p14 

    Discusses nurses' opinions regarding the rights of a lucid patient with acute illness to know the truth about his illness. Arguments regarding health care provider's therapeutic privilege; Negative effects of nondisclosure; Role of nurses.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics