TITLE

NEW-MOM MEMORY BOOSTERS

AUTHOR(S)
Colino, Stacey
PUB. DATE
February 2001
SOURCE
Parenting;Feb2001, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p44
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides tips for mothers who are experiencing memory lapses due to hormonal changes after giving birth. Organizing daily activities; Avoidance of procrastination; Importance of proper diet and rest.
ACCESSION #
4087700

 

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