TITLE

Hospitals find confession good for the bottom line

AUTHOR(S)
Greene, Jay
PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
Crain's Detroit Business;5/11/2009, Vol. 25 Issue 19, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the confessions made by medical personnel after committing medical mistakes at hospitals in Michigan. Several hospitals have been developing teams titled "I am sorry," to tell patients and their families when medical mistakes have been made. Such confession by physicians and nurses is intended to increase transparency, correct broken medical processes and focus on ethical, patient-centered approach to medical mistakes. It discusses how a typical apology process works. INSET: Apology process.
ACCESSION #
40312747

 

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