TITLE

Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

AUTHOR(S)
Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Hao Wang; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith
PUB. DATE
June 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Jun2009, Vol. 52 Issue 3, p732
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult, middle-aged, and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats received 8 weeks of tongue exercise. Protrusive tongue forces were measured before and after exercise. GG muscle fiber cross-sectional area was measured in exercised rats and was compared with cross-sectional areas in a no-exercise control group. Results: A significant increase in maximum tongue force was found following exercise in all age groups. In addition, a trend for increased GG muscle fiber cross-sectional area and a significant increase in variability of GG muscle fiber cross-sectional area was identified postexercise. Conclusion: The findings of this study have implications for treatment of elderly persons with dysphagia using tongue exercise programs. Specifically, increases in tongue force that occur following 8 weeks of progressive resistance tongue exercise may be accompanied by alterations in tongue muscle fiber morphology. These changes may provide greater strength and endurance for goal-oriented actions associated with the oropharyngeal swallow and should be investigated in future research.
ACCESSION #
40305030

 

Related Articles

  • Tongue-Pressure Resistance Training: Workout for Dysphagia. Steele, Catriona // ASHA Leader;5/18/2010, Vol. 15 Issue 6, p10 

    The article discusses the tongue-pressure resistance training as the focus in dysphagia rehabilitation. It states that the training addresses more generic oral-motor exercise, fatigue, exercise intensity and duration of treatment. It adds that tongue-pressure resistance exercise is established...

  • Progressive suppression of intracortical inhibition during graded isometric contraction of a hand muscle is not influenced by hand preference. Zoghi, Maryam; Nordstrom, Michael // Experimental Brain Research;Jan2007, Vol. 177 Issue 2, p266 

    GABAergic intracortical inhibition (ICI) in human motor cortex (M1) assists fractionated activation of muscles, and it has been suggested that hemispheric differences in ICI may contribute to hand preference. Previous studies of this issue have all been conducted at rest, with conflicting...

  • Physiological Hypertrophy of the FHL Muscle Following 8 Weeks of Progressive Resistance Exercise in the Rat. Hornberger Jr., Troy A.; Farrar, Roger P. // Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology;Feb2004, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p16 

    In humans, progressive resistance exercise is recognized for its ability to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In an attempt to develop an animal model which mimics human progressive resistance exercise, Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to climb a 1.1-m vertical (80° incline) ladder with...

  • Effects of acute eccentric contractions on rat ankle joint stiffness. Eisuke, Ochi; Naokata, Ishii; Koichi, Nakazato // Journal of Sports Science & Medicine;Dec2007, Vol. 6 Issue 4, p543 

    The article presents a study that examines whether a round of eccentric contractions (ECs) affects rat ankle joint stiffness, and evaluates muscle passive tension in the rat hindlimb to analyze the relationships of ankle joint stiffness with muscle passive tension. Results conclude that passive...

  • A NEW INSTRUMENT FOR RECORDING ORAL MUSCLE FORCES: THE PHOTOELECTRIC MYODYNAGRAPH. MARGOLIS, HERBERT I.; PRAKASH, PREM // Journal of Dental Research;Jun1954, Vol. 33 Issue 3, p425 

    The article reports on the development of a photoelectric myodynagraph that accurately measuring the forces of oral muscles. The instrument measures the magnitude of muscle forces at three levels: at rest, while functioning, and at maximum effort. A sketch is provided which shows the parts of...

  • The Force-Length Curves of the Human Rectus Femoris and Gastrocnemius Muscles in Vivo. Winter, Samantha L.; Challis, John H. // Journal of Applied Biomechanics;Feb2010, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p45 

    For a physiologically realistic joint range of motion and therefore range of muscle fiber lengths, only part of the whole muscle force-length curve can be used in vivo; that is, only a section of the force-length curve is expressed. Previous work has determined that the expressed section of the...

  • Mechanomyogram and force relationship during voluntary isometric ramp contractions of the biceps brachii muscle. Akataki, Kumi; Mita, Katsumi; Watakabe, Makoto; Itoh, Kunihiko // European Journal of Applied Physiology;Feb2001, Vol. 84 Issue 1/2, p19 

    The aim of the present study was to examine the non-stationary mechanomyogram (MMG) during voluntary isometric ramp contractions of the biceps brachii muscles using the short-time Fourier transform, and to obtain more detailed information on the motor unit (MU) activation strategy underlying in...

  • Prediction of Three Dimensional Maximum Isometric Neck Strength. Fice, Jason; Siegmund, Gunter; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien // Annals of Biomedical Engineering;Sep2014, Vol. 42 Issue 9, p1846 

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models...

  • Human involuntary postural aftercontractions are strongly modulated by limb position. Adamson, Grant; McDonagh, Martin // European Journal of Applied Physiology;Jul2004, Vol. 92 Issue 3, p343 

    Involuntary muscle activations called aftercontractions occur in skeletal muscles following sustained voluntary contractions. They are strongest following high-force voluntary contractions in proximal muscles. Their mechanism is unknown. Some authors have hypothesised that they are dependent on...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics