TITLE

Job Demands, Job Decision Latitude, and Mental Strain: Implications for Job Redesign

AUTHOR(S)
Karasek, Robert A.
PUB. DATE
June 1979
SOURCE
Administrative Science Quarterly;Jun79, Vol. 24 Issue 2, p285
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A stress-management model of job strain is developed and tested with recent national survey data from Sweden and the United States. This model predicts that mental strain results from the interaction of job demands and job decision latitude. The model appears to clarify earlier contradictory findings based on separated effects of job demands and job decision latitude. The consistent finding is that it is the combination of low decision latitude and heavy job demands which is associated with mental strain. This same combination is also associated with job dissatisfaction. In addition, the analysis of dissatisfaction reveals a complex interaction of decision latitude and job demand effects that could be easily overlooked in conventional linear, unidimensional analyses. The major implication of this study is that redesigning work processes to allow increases in decision latitude for a broad range of workers could reduce mental strain, and do so without affecting the job demands that may plausibly be associated with organizational output levels.
ACCESSION #
4009891

 

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