TITLE

THROWING STONES FROM WITHIN A GLASS HOUSE: WHY THE PROCEDURAL APPROACH TO CONFRONTATION FAILS TO REMEDY THE ILLS OF THE INDICIA OF RELIABILITY TEST, AND AN ARGUMENT FOR A BALANCED RULE

AUTHOR(S)
Eddy, Gordon
PUB. DATE
November 2008
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2008, Vol. 71 Issue 4, p1287
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author focuses on the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court on the case Crawford versus Washington, which, he claims, effected what purported to be a drastic change in Confrontation Clause jurisprudence. He cites the refusal of the Court to articulate a working definition of testimonial in the case. He mentions that the decision does little to ensure the reliability of a statement. He also suggests for the testimonial distinction to be a starting point for Constitutional Clause analysis.
ACCESSION #
40089104

 

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