TITLE

Evidence for an Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Rotator Cuff Disease

AUTHOR(S)
Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Albright, Frederick S.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.
PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;May2009, Vol. 91-A Issue 5, p1136
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: A genetic predisposition has been suggested to contribute to the risk for development of rotator cuff disease on the basis of observed family clusters of close relatives. We used a population-based resource combining genealogical data for Utah with clinical diagnosis data from a large Utah hospital to test the hypothesis of excess familial clustering for rotator cuff disease. Methods: The Utah Population Database contains combined health and genealogical data on over two million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (29827, 23412, 23410, and 23420) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (726.1, 727.61, and 840.4) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff disease. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering using two well-established methods (the Genealogical Index of Familiality test and the estimation of relative risks in relatives) in the overall study group (3091 patients) and a subgroup of the study group diagnosed before the age of forty years (652 patients). Results: The Genealogical Index of Familiality test in patients diagnosed before the age of forty years showed significant excess relatedness for individuals with rotator cuff disease in close and distant relationships (as distant as third cousins) (p = 0.001). The relative risk of rotator cuff disease in the relatives of patients diagnosed before the age of forty years was significantly elevated for second degree (relative risk = 3.66, p = 0.0076) and third degree (relative risk = 1.81, p = 0.0479) relatives. Conclusions: We analyzed a set of patients with diagnosed rotator cuff disease and a known genealogy to describe the familial clustering of affected individuals. The observations of significant excess relatedness of patients and the significantly elevated risks to both close and distant relatives of patients strongly support a heritable predisposition to rotator cuff disease. Clinical Relevance: A better understanding of the familial risk of rotator cuff disease could lead to the identification of candidate genes predisposing individuals to rotator cuff disease. Gene identification will possibly allow the development of improved treatments, including biologic augmentations of rotator cuff repairs, which may improve tendon healing and repair outcomes. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
ACCESSION #
39658503

 

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