TITLE

Lexical, Syntactic, and Stress-Pattern Cues for Speech Segmentation

AUTHOR(S)
Sanders, Lisa D.; Neville, Helen J.
PUB. DATE
December 2000
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Dec2000, Vol. 43 Issue 6, p1301
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses a study which assessed the use of multiple segmentation cues using full sentences presented as continuous speech. Use of multiple segmentation cues by adults; Methods; Results.
ACCESSION #
3945947

 

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