TITLE

Bio-accumulation and distribution of heavy metals in black mustard ( Brassica nigra Koch)

AUTHOR(S)
Angelova, Violina; Ivanov, Krasimir
PUB. DATE
June 2009
SOURCE
Environmental Monitoring & Assessment;Jun2009, Vol. 153 Issue 1-4, p449
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There has been carried out a comparative research, which to allow us to determine the quantities and the depots of accumulation of Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd in the vegetative and reproductive organs of Brassica nigra, as well as to identify the possibilities of growing on soils, contaminated by heavy metals and its use for the purposes of the phytoremeditation. Experiments have been implemented in field and in controlled conditions. B. nigra is tolerant towards the heavy metals and could be successfully grown in regions of low and moderate level of contamination with heavy metals, without lowering of the quantity and quality of the manufactured production. The depots for accumulation, in case it is being grown on contaminated soils without Cu follows the order: roots > fruit’s shells > stems > seeds. In the case of its growing on non-contaminated soils the order roots > fruit’s shells > seeds > stems preserves for the Pb, while the order for the Cu, Zn, and Cd is: fruit’s shells > seeds > stems > roots. A relation is determined between the quantity of the total and the mobile forms of metals on one hand, and their total quantity in the plants in the field, as well as, in the pot experiments, on the other. A drastic exclusion is made by the Pb in the pot experiments, as its basic part is blocked in compounds that are hardly soluble. Its absorption by the plants is almost entirely blocked, which is almost a degree lower than that obtained in the field experiments and is commensurable with the results obtained in non-contaminated soils. Clarification of the reasons causing this effect requires additional examinations and above all, fractionation of the soil and determination of the forms and depots of localization of Pb compounds.
ACCESSION #
39142444

 

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