TITLE

Effects of genomic imprinting on quantitative traits

AUTHOR(S)
Hamish Spencer
PUB. DATE
June 2009
SOURCE
Genetica;Jun2009, Vol. 136 Issue 2, p285
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Abstract  Standard Mendelian genetic processes incorporate several symmetries, one of which is that the level of expression of a gene inherited from an organism’s mother is identical to the level should that gene have been inherited paternally. For a small number of loci in a variety of taxa, this symmetry does not hold; such genes are said to be “genomically imprinted” (or simply “imprinted”). The best known examples of imprinted loci come from mammals and angiosperms, although there are also cases from several insects and some data suggesting that imprinting exists in zebra fish. Imprinting means that reciprocal heterozygotes need not be, on average, phenotypically identical. When this difference is incorporated into the standard quantitative-genetic model for two alleles at a single locus, a number of standard expressions are altered in fundamental ways. Most importantly, in contrast to the case with euMendelian expression, the additive and dominance deviations are correlated. It would clearly be of interest to be able to separate imprinting effects from maternal genetic effects, but when the latter are added to the model, the well-known generalized least-squares approach to deriving breeding values cannot be applied. Distinguishing these two types of parent-of-origin effects is not a simple problem and requires further research.
ACCESSION #
38901733

 

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