TITLE

NEW STRAIN OF Verticillium dahliae IN NORTH AMERICA

AUTHOR(S)
Gulya, T.
PUB. DATE
December 2007
SOURCE
Helia;2007, Vol. 30 Issue 47, p115
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A new strain of Verticillium dahliae, the fungus causing Verticillium leaf mottle and wilt, was identified from northwestern Minnesota in 2002. The new strain or biotype is characterized by its ability to overcome the single, dominant V-1 resistance gene employed in oilseed and confection hybrids. Samples collected in 2003 from diseased plants confirmed the new biotype also exists in Manitoba, Canada. Limited survey, conducted in September 2004, identified the new strain in roughly one-quarter of fields showing Verticillium wilt in North Dakota. In greenhouse trials in 2004/5 we tested 221 cultivars for reaction to the new Verticillium strain. One entry from the USDA Plant Introduction collection, developed in Russia as VNIIMK 8883, was immune and would be an ideal source of resistance. Other commercial oilseed hybrids from the U.S., Argentina and Europe, were also noted with ratings of 0.5 or lower on a 0 to 5 scale. On a related note, another fungus, Phialophora asteris F. sp. helianthi, was isolated from oilseed sunflower plants showing leaf mottle symptoms in Minot, North Dakota in 2002, and presumed to be due to Verticillium dahliae. In greenhouse inoculations, Phialophora produced leaf mottle symptoms on sunflower lines with and without the V-1 gene, which were very similar to those incited by V. dahliae. Proper identification of this pathogen from plants displaying leaf mottle symptoms will be necessary to avoid confusion between the two pathogens.
ACCESSION #
38897912

 

Related Articles

  • Vegetative compatibility and pathogenicity of Verticillium dahliae isolates from sunflower. JING Lan; PEI Xu; YANG Liu-qing; LI Li; ZHOU Hong-you; ZHAO Jun // Chinese Journal of Oil Crop Sciences;2014, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p106 

    Sunflower verticillium wilt has become a severe disease in China in recent years. In order to understand the variation and differentiation of the pathogen, 120 Verticiilium dahliae strains were obtained from plants which showed typical verticiilium wilt symptoms collected from Heilongjiang...

  • Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Isolate Specific and Isolate Non-Specific Partial Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Sunflower. Amoozadeh, M.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Davar, R.; Abdollahi Mandoulakani, B.; Haddadi, P.; Basirnia, A. // Journal of Agricultural Science & Technology;Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p213 

    Basal stem rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is one of the most important diseases of sunflower. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) implicated in partial resistance to two isolates of S. sclerotiorum (SSU107 and SSKH41) were investigated using F9 recombinant inbred lines (RILs)...

  • VERTICILOSIS EN GERMOPLASMA DE GIRASOL. González, J.; Mancuso, N.; Ludueña, P.; Ivancovich, A. // Helia;2007, Vol. 30 Issue 47, p121 

    Verticillium dahliae (Kleb) is a major sunflower disease (Helianthus annuus L.) in Argentina. The aim of this study was to evaluate different lines of EEA Pergamino sunflower breeding program for Verticillium reaction in order to find effective sources of Verticillium resistance. A method of...

  • Genetics, Host Range, and Molecular and Pathogenic Characterization of Verticillium dahliae From Sunflower Reveal Two Differentiated Groups in Europe. Martín-Sanz, Alberto; Rueda, Sandra; García-Carneros, Ana B.; González-Fernández, Sara; Miranda-Fuentes, Pedro; Castuera-Santacruz, Sandra; Molinero-Ruiz, Leire // Frontiers in Plant Science;3/9/2018, p1 

    Verticillium wilt and leaf mottle of sunflower, caused by the fungus Verticillium dahliae (Vd) has become a major constraint to sunflower oil production in temperate European countries. Information about Vd from sunflower is very scarce despite genetics, molecular traits and pathogenic abilities...

  • COMPONENTS OF QUANTITATIVE RESISTANCE TO DOWNY MILDEW (PLASMOPARA HALSTEDII) IN SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS). Sakr, Nachaat // Journal of Plant Protection Research;2009, Vol. 49 Issue 3, p297 

    Components of quantitative resistance in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) to Plasmopara halstedii, the pathogen causing downy mildew, were investigated. Percentage infection, latent period, sporulation density and reduction of hypocotyl length were compared on two sunflower lines showing different...

  • Molecular mapping of the rust resistance gene R to a large NBS-LRR cluster on linkage group 13 of sunflower. Qi, L.; Hulke, B.; Vick, B.; Gulya, T. // Theoretical & Applied Genetics;Jul2011, Vol. 123 Issue 2, p351 

    Rust is a serious fungal disease in the sunflower growing areas worldwide with increasing importance in North America in recent years. Several genes conferring resistance to rust have been identified in sunflower, but few of them have been genetically mapped and linked to molecular markers. The...

  • Inheritance of resistance to two races of sunflower downy mildew (Plasmopara halstedii) in two Helianthus annuus L. lines. Molinero-Ruiz, M.L.; Melero-Vara, J.M.; Domínguez, J. // Euphytica;Apr2003, Vol. 131 Issue 1, p47 

    Sunflower downy mildew caused by Plasmopara halstedii is an important disease of sunflower capable of causing losses of more than 80% of production. Races 100, 300, 310, 330, 710, 703, 730 and 770 of the fungus have been identified in Spain. Race 703, of high virulence, has been identified...

  • Durability of Resistance to Rust in Sunflower: Implications for Resistance Breeding. Llamas, María José; Prats, Elena; Rubiales, Diego // Field & Vegetable Crops Research / Ratarstvo i povrtarstvo;2010, Vol. 47 Issue 2, p435 

    Sunflower rust is caused by Puccinia helianthi Shw. and is an important disease in Argentina, Australia, Canada, Egypt, Israel, Turkey, USA and the former USSR. Sunflower rust is a macrocyclic, heterothallic and autoecious fungus, surviving mainly in plant debris in soil in the form of...

  • Fungus v. fungus. Fenyvesi, Charles // U.S. News & World Report;2/10/97, Vol. 122 Issue 5, p16 

    Discusses a mysterious fungus called Discula destructiva. Impact on the Cornus florida, the flowering dogwood; Possibility the fungus could wipe out the North American native; Chemical antidote that has eluded researchers; Projects in which scientists are fighting fungi with fungi.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics