TITLE

Is fear the motivation for physician aid in dying?

PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
Hospice Management Advisor;May2009, Vol. 14 Issue 5, p55
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the findings of a March 9, 2009 research paper published in the "Archives of Internal Medicine," which states that dying hospice care patients in Oregon appear to be motivated by worries about future pain and loss of autonomy. In this study, researchers surveyed 56 individuals who requested physician aid in dying or contacted a related advocacy organization. Results suggest that patients first request physician aid in dying in anticipation of future suffering.
ACCESSION #
38712762

 

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