TITLE

The High Cost of Cyberslacking

AUTHOR(S)
Greengard, Samuel
PUB. DATE
December 2000
SOURCE
Workforce (10928332);Dec2000, Vol. 79 Issue 12, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Deals with cyberslackers and cyber loafers, employees who use the Internet for activities not related to business. Impact of cyberslackers on productivity; Role of human resources professionals in developing a strategy to manage Internet use of employees; Efforts of Xerox Corp. to punish cyberslacking employees.
ACCESSION #
3846758

 

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