TITLE

Exclusive Dealing in the Chartist Movement

AUTHOR(S)
Gurney, Peter
PUB. DATE
April 2009
SOURCE
Labour History Review (Maney Publishing);Apr2009, Vol. 74 Issue 1, p90
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Chartism was a movement of consumers as well as producers. This article explores this hypothesis by considering the development and significance of exclusive dealing and consumers' co-operation, which grew out of this practice, for Chartists. First, the genealogy of the tactic is traced and the way in which exclusive dealing was initially employed by both radicals and Tories highlighted. The article then discusses forms of market exploitation — particularly adulteration, truck and tommy shops — that seriously affected working-class consumers. From the late 1830s, exclusive dealing was increasingly regarded as the best way to remedy these grievances and correct a perceived imbalance between producers and consumers. The role of Robert Lowery is assessed, a key figure in the initial, enthusiastic phase of Chartist co-operation before the debacle of the general strike in 1842. By the end of the decade, it is argued, exclusive dealing was rejected by some of the Chartist leadership as too confrontational, while the appeal of shopkeeping more narrowly defined continued to grow in working-class communities. The article ends with a consideration of the critique of Ernest Jones who, among others, condemned the uncoupling of economic from political components of the radical cause.
ACCESSION #
38420387

 

Related Articles

  • Late Chartism in the Potteries, 1848–1858. Fyson, Robert // Labour History Review (Maney Publishing);Apr2009, Vol. 74 Issue 1, p111 

    In the Potteries, as in most industrial districts, Chartism revived in 1848. Chartist activity in 1850–2 was centred on the Hanley People's Hall and its journal the Lever, also (until 1853) the Longton Working Men's Hall. Thereafter a hard core of thirty or forty Chartists sustained the...

  • Get up, stand up. Tripathi, Salil // New Statesman;4/27/2009, Vol. 138 Issue 4946, p50 

    In this article the author discusses the anti-racism, pro-immigrant movement that began in Southall, a section of London, England, during the 1970s. According to the article the movement grew out of a counter-demonstration staged by young men of Asian descent against the National Front, a...

  • Return of the Militias. Potok, Mark // Intelligence Report;Fall2009, Issue 135, p1 

    The author reflects on the history of the emergence of the antigovernment "Patriot" movement. He argues that the movement is composed of paramilitary militias. He contends that the movement was started by those angry with the U.S. government and the deaths of political protestors at Ruby Ridge,...

  • The History of Consumption: A Literature Review and Consumer Guide. McCracken, Grant // Journal of Consumer Policy;1987, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p139 

    Examines literature on the history of consumption and offers a consumer guide for those who want to use it in the study of modern consumer behavior and policy. Significant studies about the history of consumption; Salient contexts in the history of consumption; Sociological perspectives on how...

  • GLOBALISATION, MARKET FORMATION AND COMMODITISATION IN THE SPANISH EMPIRE. CONSUMER DEMAND FOR ASIAN GOODS IN MEXICO CITY AND SEVILLE, C. 1571-1630. GASCH-TOMÁS, JOSÉ L. // Revista de Historia Económica / Journal of Iberian & Latin Amer;Sep2014, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p189 

    This article aims to shed light on the process and mechanisms through which Asian manufactured goods (Chinese silk and porcelain, among others) were commoditised and how markets for such goods were formed in the Spanish Empire. After the opening of the Manila Galleon route in 1571 supply of and...

  • L'HYMNE AU "BON SENS" ou la ritualisation du faux d�bat sur la jeunesse. Steinauer-Cresson, Genevi�ve; Gros, Dominique // Swiss Journal of Sociology;1984, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p131 

    The political, intellectual and media responses to Swiss youth protests in the spring of 1980 are discussed. Philosopher Jeanne Hersch responded to government calls for dialog in the "Tribune de Gen�ve" during the fall of 1981. Hersch argued that psychologically there was more continuity...

  • Popular Protest in China. Paltemaa, Lauri // China Journal;Jul2009, Issue 62, p159 

    The article reviews the book "Popular Protest in China," by Kevin O'Brien.

  • French Revolution or Peasants' Revolt? Petitioners and Rebels in England from the Blanketeers to the Chartists. Poole, Robert // Labour History Review (Maney Publishing);Apr2009, Vol. 74 Issue 1, p6 

    Coming from Manchester in 1817, the march of the 'Blanketeers' has generally been taken to be something to do with the industrial revolution: at least an eruption of distress, at most an attempted revolution. This article returns to the sources to show how both the march and the attempted...

  • Demokratie ohne Protest? Zur Wirkungsgeschichte sozialer Bewegungen. Rucht, Dieter // Neue Soziale Bewegungen;sep2013, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p65 

    For Dieter Rucht, member of the advisory board of this journal, there is no democracy without protest. Themes of what constitutes a dignified existence, a good life and the struggle for recognition are at the heart of protest activities today, and likely in the future. The democractic question...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics