TITLE

AN AUTUMN VISITOR

AUTHOR(S)
Schofield, BRian
PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
American Rose;May/Jun2009, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A personal narrative is presented which explores the author's experience of finding a hole in his rosebuds caused by caterpillar.
ACCESSION #
38217583

 

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