TITLE

Zinc, Copper, and Metallothionein Metabolism after Jejunoileal Bypass Surgery or Small Bowel Resection in Rats

AUTHOR(S)
Rodriguez, Jaime A.; O'Leary, J. Patrick; Sandoval, Manuel; Udall, J.N.; Hempe, James M.
PUB. DATE
November 2000
SOURCE
American Surgeon;Nov2000, Vol. 66 Issue 11, p1004
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Liver dysfunction is a frequent complication of jejunoileal bypass (JIB) surgery, a procedure commonly used until recently to treat morbid obesity. It has been suggested that liver failure in JIB patients is due to bacterial overgrowth and translocation from the bypassed intestine. Because invading microorganisms cause hepatic inflammation these experiments evaluated zinc, copper, and metallothionein (MT) in two experimental rat models of intestinal surgery to determine whether their distribution in plasma and tissues was similar to the highly characteristic pattern observed during an inflammatory response. In the JIB rat model 90 per cent of the small intestine was isolated from the flow of digesta but remained viable in the abdominal cavity. In the small bowel resection (SBR) model 90 per cent of the small intestine was removed and the remaining intestine was resected. Data collected 21 days after surgery showed decreased growth rate and plasma zinc in the SBR and JIB rats that was significantly improved by supplemental zinc. All other measures of zinc, copper, and MT metabolism in the SBR rats were similar to those of controls. In JIB rats, however, liver copper, MT protein, and MT mRNA were significantly elevated, and a high proportion of the intracellular zinc and copper was associated with MT. The pattern of zinc, copper, and MT distribution in systemic circulation and liver of JIB rats suggests hepatic inflammation superimposed on low zinc and copper status. Lack of a similar response in the SBR rats confirms the involvement of the bypassed intestinal segment and supports the hypothesis that bacterial overgrowth and translocation are responsible for liver inflammation and dysfunction in JIB patients.
ACCESSION #
3787251

 

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