TITLE

Great Depression? Hardly

AUTHOR(S)
Weber, Rick
PUB. DATE
March 2009
SOURCE
Trailer / Body Builders;Mar2009, Vol. 50 Issue 5, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the assessment of Willian Strauss of the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago of the U.S. economy during the Heavy Duty Dialogue. He urged people to stop comparing the recession to the Great Depression. He warned that unemployment will still be on the rise, and the credit market and the weak housing market will pose risks but the downward trend will allegedly stop once the housing sector begins to moderate, sometime in 2009. He explained that the Federal Reserve's aggressive actions have produced positive signs of improvement.
ACCESSION #
37794216

 

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