TITLE

WHY LESS MEANS MORE WHEN IT COMES TO EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT

AUTHOR(S)
Birkinshaw, Julian; Goddard, Jules
PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
People Management;5/31/2007, Vol. 13 Issue 11, p45
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the principles that can be applied when developing a personnel management model. Such principles include vision, hierarchical power, bureaucratic procedure and extrinsic rewards. The author notes that the principles depict the different ways of working that could involve less management effort but better results.
ACCESSION #
37793813

 

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