TITLE

Waltzing on Wall Street

AUTHOR(S)
Piszczalski, Martin
PUB. DATE
November 2000
SOURCE
Automotive Manufacturing & Production;Nov2000, Vol. 112 Issue 11, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Deals with the significance of Wall Street to the automobile industry in the United States. State of the automobile industry stocks as of November 2000; Disparity between the growth in the automobile industry and several high technology companies; Interest of Wall Street in the purchasing power of the automobile industry; Analysis of the business-to-business strategy of the industry.
ACCESSION #
3772527

 

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