TITLE

Plastics Under the Hood

AUTHOR(S)
Weber, Austin
PUB. DATE
April 2009
SOURCE
Assembly;Apr2009, Vol. 52 Issue 4, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the use of plastics to replace metal parts in the vehicle's engine compartment. Automobile makers and suppliers are developing vehicle plastic parts, such as air-intake manifolds, valve covers, engine covers and others to reduce the overall weight of the vehicle and improve fuel efficiency. An increase in the use of plastics is expected as manufacturers, such as General Motors and Ford Motor Co., are racing to build small, fuel-efficient engines.
ACCESSION #
37584911

 

Related Articles

  • More Composites for Cars? Smock, Doug // Design News;Nov2010, Vol. 65 Issue 11, p52 

    The article reports on the application of carbon-fiber-reinforced composites in automobiles to reduce weight and increase vehicle range in the U.S. It mentions that composites can substantially reduce the mass of an automobile in its seven major areas including the hood, battery module and rear...

  • ONE world. Horn, Greg // Automotive Body Repair News;May2011, Vol. 50 Issue 5, p21 

    The article focuses on the move towards global vehicle platforms which may result in consistent assembly methods and lower parts prices. It mentions the reinvention of Ford Motor Co. and General Motors (GM) Corp. in order to reduce costs and increase value and packaging in the U.S. market. It...

  • Crumbling cornerstone. Tita, Bob // Crain's Chicago Business;12/20/2004, Vol. 27 Issue 51, p1 

    The article reports that automobile parts makers in the Chicago area are bracing for the latest in a series of body blows when Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. slash new car production early next year. Already weakened by rising raw material costs and price cuts demanded by automakers,...

  • US vehicle sales: Asian inroads.  // MarketWatch: Automotive;Jun2005, Vol. 4 Issue 5, p6 

    The article reports on the declining sales of American car makers, Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp., in the domestic market. One of the common issues facing the manufacturers is the growing popularity of the fuel-efficient cars offered by Asian carmakers. Hybrid vehicles, in which Toyota...

  • Competition is wonderful. Crain, Keith // Automotive News;8/14/2000, Vol. 74 Issue 5888, p12 

    Looks at how competition has led many automakers to consider increasing the fuel economy of their sport-utility vehicles. Announcement of fuel-economy improvements by Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp.; Advantages of allowing market forces to dictate corporate environmental policy instead...

  • Is magnesium's growth slowing?  // Ward's Auto World;Feb97, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p55 

    Discusses a decline in the use of magnesium in automobile parts in the United States. General Motors Corp.'s postponement of a program to develop magnesium transmission cases; Ford Motor Co.'s decision not to change from steel to magnesium in Windstar minivan seat frames.

  • Ford, GM Move Into Web Lane. Duvall, Mel // Inter@ctive Week;11/22/99, Vol. 6 Issue 48, p28 

    Announces the separate plans of Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. to build Internet marketplaces for purchasing automobile parts and supplies. Advantage of the marketplaces for both companies; Predicted revenue of the Ford marketplace.

  • Virginia supplier doubles wheel hub output. Chappell, Lindsay // Automotive News;10/3/2005, Vol. 80 Issue 6169, p22 

    This article reports that Virginia Forge Co., a highly automated forging plant in Buchanan, Virginia, is expanding to double its output of wheel hub components for pickups and SUVs. Virginia Forge will spend $18.3 million to double its forged steel hub capacity to 10 million pieces a year. The...

  • Makers stir CAFE debate. Stoffer, Harry // Automotive News;8/7/2000, Vol. 74 Issue 5887, p1 

    Reports that car companies Ford Motor and General Motors plan to improve fuel economy of their sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks as of August 7, 2000. Implications for the public debate over the federal corporate average fuel economy (CAFE); Organizations calling for higher CAFE standards.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics